The Lost Sons of Sirius

May 28, 2012 at 11:19 am (Uncategorized)

When Romulus and Remus were born, they were sent off in a basket on the River Tiber, and when the basket ran aground, the twin babies were suckled by a she-wolf, sustaining them long enough to be discovered and raised by a shepherd. As adults, the brothers wanted to found a city where the wolf had cared for them, but disagreed over the location. ReminiScent of the story of Cain(!) and Abel, Romulus killed Remus and gave his own name to the city of Rome. REMUS reverses to SUMER, which was the ‘cradle of civilization’ in modern-day Iraq. This word-play should serve as a clue that these symbolic stories need to be considered in a number of ways.

Why is it important that the “founders of civilization” were suckled by wolves? What does this imply?

The canine was been worshiped as a DoGoD for ages, but also demonized as a Hellhound. Hel, from Norse mythology, was often pictured with hounds, just like Odin, the All-Father who rode to Hel.

Ever will I Gods blaspheme
Freyja methinks a dog does seem,
Freyja a dog? Aye! Let them be
Both dogs together Odin and she!
~
Hjalti Skeggiason, newly converted Christian

During the battle of Ragnarok Odin is foretold to be killed by the wolf Fenrir (Fe -> Iron -> #26 -> Z -> end) [DOG=26]. The Neverending Story, a German tale, shows the Wolf as a representative of The Nothing, killed by the young hunter before the world can be re-born. Stories of dogs and wolves, and their varied relationships with humans, can be found throughout the history and mythology of people around the world.

In Egypt there was the Egyptian Anubis, a Jackal-headed figure associated with the Underworld. The Jack-Al can reveal much when considered in light of our popular culture.

Jack Nicholson, the Irish actor, has literally and symbolically represented a dog that has become a bit mad from being confined and domesticated. All work and no play makes Jackal a bad dog. The canine may be caged, but he can still go out “to the bars” and drink some Jack Daniels.

Some “successful” people these days will look down condescendingly toward the “dumb” dogs, but don’t have the common sense (scents) to figure out they are wearing collars and leashes (also known as ties).

This topic is VAST. I did a two hour radio show with Will Miller from Second Look Radio concerning domesticated animals (including humans), with a special focus on Canines.

Breaking Free From The Politics of Animal Farm

The show was on blogtalkradio, ergo commercial-free! We dug up some really interesting information, but admittedly only scratched the surface. For example, I didn’t mention that K9 can be seen as KI, the basis for KIng, KIll, KIss, KId, and more.

We didn’t look too hard into the codes from the world of cinema. There are a couple of Sync videos on this topic that are worth watching with a critical mind: The Dog Star, the Rabbit Hole and the Underworld & Dark Knight of The Sol.

Also, if you missed my regularly-scheduled Star Theory Radio show, have a listen!

The Magic of Our Alchemical Alphabet

This world is only “dog eat dog” because of training and conditioning. I think it’s about time we teach the old dogs some new tricks.

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4 Comments

  1. alex robinson said,

    Doggone it that was indeed an interesting sync – even down to the Cain twinning 🙂

    I did actually leave a wolfish angle out of my article, not wanting to take too many twists & turns. I’d wondered if Anne Boleyn might ever have been called a ‘she-wolf’ as she did so much to bring about the new Rome in England – instead she seems to be more of a Remus’ian figure – however what I did find was that her successor, Jane Seymour was the she wolf – she was born at “Wolf Hall”

  2. transcenddesigns said,

    Great show Kyle! thanks for revisiting the Rainbow Alphabet, this show really f l o w ed nice…! Be well!

  3. Men Without Faces… Boys Without Names | said,

    […] boy shoos off the gawkers. Again – he is made to protect the predator. Like a guard dog. The man subdues the […]

  4. Ross said,

    Kyle, can I ask you and anyone else passing this way where the term ‘off of’ has come from? This has been bothering me for a while, and I heard you use it on a show the other day. The ‘of’ is superfluous – ‘He took a cup off of the shelf’ should read ‘He took a cup off the shelf’. Is this a standard Americanism? I don’t think it is, because I’ve watched (far too much) American film and television over the last few decades, and am certain that it has only appeared in the last few years. Today it is all over the place, even displacing ‘from’ in some instances.
    So this a new thing, which offers no obvious linguistic advantage. Therefore I suggest it is a deliberate contrived distortion of the language. For it to have become so widespread it must have been actively pushed out by the Medes into the wider consciousness, and if this is the case it would have been done so for a reason.
    I am a novice in such matters, but if o = zero and f = 6 then the addition of a 6 to such a commonly used term would have obvious implications, although I daresay that is somewhat simplistic.
    There is this fascinating discourse on Oracle framed by the Celtic Rebel on one side and Dennis Fetcho on the other. The former believes English is a constrictive control mechanism while the latter believes it is a repository for profound esoteric wisdom. Although they are not directly competing philosophies, I disagree with Alex’s ideas on this. I think the English language is so flexible grammatically (sod the academics, by all means split an infinitive if you so wish!) and has such a diverse vocabulary, it is essentially neutral. It is a broad palette, we can each choose what colours and what combinations of colours to use, it is a creative playground for us to explore. However this flexibility does also mean it can be used against us, but we have to collude with those machinations because it is we and we alone who decide what words we use.
    ‘He took a cup off the shelf’. That is all that needs to be said on the matter.

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